Archive for September, 2009

screen porch and an entry study

Author: Travis Kinney

I’ve been working on a screen porch and an entry roof design for a client. Here are some recent studies of the entry roof.

Existing entry

Existing entry

I produced two sketches, a narrow roof and a wide roof. The existing brick walkway and step doesn’t align with the doors, so there wasn’t really any strong vertical axis pushing the decision one way or the other.

narrow roof

narrow roof

Wide entry roof

Wide entry roof

The final consensus is to produce working drawings of the wider entry roof. I believe it looks better and help break-up the three casement windows. The face of the house here, is very tall and the wide horizontal roof helps break that up.

Here’s a section sketch showing the decorative wood brackets. The roof wil most likely be black or bronze colored standing seam metal with a possible integrated gutter.

section

section

Here’s a plan sketch for a possible screen porch and deck looking out toward the water.

screen porch and deck plan

screen porch and deck plan

Here’s a sketch of the screen porch interior. The space is designed for low maintenance. All the furniture is nice quality outdoor products and the floor is stone.

view of screen porch interior

view of screen porch interior

dormer design

Author: Travis Kinney

I was recently hired to help a client enlarge the second floor of an old cape. The existing shared bathroom was incredibly small and narrow as were the flanking bedrooms. You see this a lot with older capes that have little second floor dormers and steep roofs. The steep roofs are nice and fit with the character of the cape, but you also end up having knee-walls in the upstairs rooms 4′ to 5′ in from the exterior wall because 2′ high knee-walls are quite useless. What I decided upon was adding a shed dormer across the bathroom and both bedrooms. The square footage added to both bedrooms and the bathroom was dramatic. I kept the dormer held back from the side walls of the cape in order to preserve the classical lines of the cape. From the driveway side and oceanside, it still looks like a small cape. Following is photograph taken in the winter showing the original three-little gable dormer. The second image is actually a copy of the first photo with a sketch of my proposed design added to it. The third photo shows the finished product.

boys before

original cape

Shed dormer design

Shed dormer design

Completed shed dormer

Completed shed dormer

Here’s a partial second floor plan of the house. If you look close, you will see dashed line showing where the three small dormers used to be located . Below this sketch plan is the a cleaned up version of the actual construction drawing. You can see the window sizes changed, the toilet and shower location changed and the closets are a bit different. All were refinements made as we moved forward with the design and got more specific about each element.

Second floor plan - partial

Second floor plan - partial

floor plan cleaned-up (dimensions, notes and tags removed)

floor plan cleaned-up (dimensions, notes and tags removed)

Cleaned-up construction plan

Garages that look like barns

Author: Travis Kinney

I have designed a number of 3-car garages over the years and a lot of them are designed to look “barn-like”. Typically when someone tells me they want a three car garage; I ask if it’s for three cars or two cars and stuff (kids toys, yard equipment etc.). More often than not, it’s not for a third car, but for stuff. One garage plan layout that I like is two garage doors on the gable end of the building with a third bay in the back accessed from the side of the building. I will try to post numerous sketches and photos of garage I have design over the years. To start with; here are a couple sketches produced for a couple in Cumberland. They wanted an ell shaped garage with two garage doors at each gable end. Two cars would use one set of doors and a tractor and boat would access through the second pair. The are in the back corner of the ell would be a space for a small workshop and some chickens.

shingle dark green barn

new garage to look like old barn

small secondary garage

small secondary garage

initial garage-barn sketch

initial garage-barn sketch

Kitchen

Author: Travis Kinney

This is kitchen I designed and was finished last Fall (except for the backsplash tile). The white stone counter is Calacatta marble which is similar to Carrara but will often have some browns and faint green tints. The wood on the island top is 2″ thick gunstock grade walnut that was purchased through a family saw mill in Northern Maine. The full height natural wood cabinetwork is also made from walnut. The antique looking hardware on walnut millwork is from Cliffside Industries.

kitchen 04

kitchen 03

Rangeley Lodge

Author: Travis Kinney

I was hired to help renovate a late 1800’s lodge located on Mooselookmeguntic Lake. The owner wanted to remove portions that had been built and added onto during the 60’s and 70′ ruining the character of the original log structure. My client had already put a new foundation under the building in preparation of this work. Here’s a photo of what we started with…..

lodge before

My recommended plan completely relocated the kitchen from it’s current location which was limiting the size of the living room. The new kitchen is being located beyond those three windows shown in photo of existing.

Here’s a copy of my elevation drawing of this side….

cadd elevation

The floor plan has dining room seating in front of the large cottage style windows with the kitchen beyond. We added more doors from living room to existing front porch. There’s an addition on the back that was added (which can’t be sen in these photos and drawings).

Here’s a photo taken during construction…

lodge

Here’s a copy of my interior concept sketch. Can’t wait to see how it turns out.

lodge interior

A client of mine was looking at this large rambling house that one’s kids could easily get lost in. Even though it was a large house and had some amazing spaces, the day-to-day entry experience was NOT great. The owners would always enter through the garage which-kinda- ok. People coming to the house however, would be unsure where to park. Lots of room near garage, but no logical entrance. If you parked where I think the driveway layout intends for you to park, there’s a walkway up a solid wood door, and no real entry experience beyond. My clients didn’t want to make a bid on the house without knowing something could be done to improve upon the entrance and kitchen. They also wanted to know what the associated cost might be.

Here’s a partial floor plan showing where the connector between garage and kitchen is located. You can see the problem right off, there’s this huge interior corner of the building shoved right between the two function – mudroom and kitchen. It seemed logical to a open this corner up, both expanding the mudroom and the kitchen. We could also get in a walk-in pantry which a house this size ought to have.

existing plan Here’s a photo looking toward that corner from the exterior. You can see the “front” door to the right in the photo. Inviting isn’t it? What’s interesting is that there’s a logical path across the grass from the “front” entry walkway over to the garage driveway. Clearly, people have been cutting across that way. In my proposed design I decided to formally link the front walkway to the parking area in front of garage.

before Here’s my plan sketch that I gave to the owners with some rough numbers on cost. You can see that we redid the entire kitchen as they wanted to also open it up more to the existing dining room. For an 8,000+ sf house, the existing kitchen sure was small!

entry proposed

Here’s my exterior sketch showing the proposed new entry. This space will get lots of light. You’ll be able to see who’s coming while working in the kitchen. The majority of the roof is flat as there are so many complicated roofs all crashing together. I put the gabled roof over the entry to provide some protection and also to give it a welcoming feel. The flat rubber roof will drain over the three windows to the left of the entry and there are three matching windows to the right. Snow and rainwater can collect here and not onto the entry steps! The reason I added stone to the base was twofold; I wanted the mudroom/ entry to feel kinda conservatory like. Secondly, there’s some great stonework on the oceanside of the house, but none on the street side. I thought it would be nice to add some to this side.

proposed perspective